Review: Places No One Knows

Yovanoff Places no one

Title: Places No One Knows

Author: Brenna Yovanoff

Published: May 17, 2016

Synopsis (from Goodreads):

For fans of Lauren Oliver and E. Lockhart, here is a dreamy love story set in the dark halls of contemporary high school, from New York Times bestselling author Brenna Yovanoff.

Waverly Camdenmar spends her nights running until she can’t even think. Then the sun comes up, life goes on, and Waverly goes back to her perfectly hateful best friend, her perfectly dull classes, and the tiny, nagging suspicion that there’s more to life than student council and GPAs.

Marshall Holt is a loser. He drinks on school nights and gets stoned in the park. He is at risk of not graduating, he does not care, he is no one. He is not even close to being in Waverly’s world.

But then one night Waverly falls asleep and dreams herself into Marshall’s bedroom—and when the sun comes up, nothing in her life can ever be the same. In Waverly’s dreams, the rules have changed. But in her days, she’ll have to decide if it’s worth losing everything for a boy who barely exists.

Places No One Knows is an unusual book. I know the synopsis makes it sound a bit like a typical teen novel with all the common tropes: the perfect, overachieving girl; the slacker guy who drinks and does drugs; a romance that develops between two people of completely different cliques/social classes/insert any other category here. How many times has that been done, right? But trust me when I say it’s not like that.

Waverly, for one, is not your typical perfect popular girl. She has two tarantulas as pets. She likes gory horror movies. She is a bit of a sociopath: when asked why she’s friends with certain people, she says, “They have their uses.” She puts on a mask for the world and plays her role. Nobody knows her true thoughts and feelings. And Marshall – Marshall feels too much all the time, and that can be too much, and I just want to wrap him up in a big hug.

dream girlDreams can be fascinating, and the ideas of waking up in someone else’s dream or dreaming yourself into someone’s life are pretty cool. Beyond the dream aspect, there were no other paranormal/fantasy aspects, so this was more realistic than some of Brenna Yovanoff’s other books. Waverly dreaming herself into Marshall’s room essentially served the purpose of allowing them to connect and get to know each other away from prying eyes, when they normally would never talk to each other.

I just loved what developed between Waverly and Marshall. There were several scenes that epitomized, or tried to, showing someone all the messy, ugly parts of yourself, the parts you normally keep hidden, and yet they say, I see all of you and I still want/like you anyway. And isn’t that all anyone wants? I was rooting for Waverly and Marshall to allow themselves to be vulnerable and embrace what they have, despite what others might think.

Places No One Knows is well-written and has a dreamy quality to it, which makes sense given the subject matter. I loved this book; it was one of those ones where I wanted to keep reading more and more of it, yet at the same time I wanted to go slow and savour it. The reader’s dilemma! I would definitely recommend it.

Favourite Quotes:

“The way he watches me is physical – a pressure on my skin. He is so tender, so immediate, and I am only good at wanting things from a safe distance.”

“It’s so hard to love someone when you have to do it in the open. The second you expose a thing to air, it has already begun to oxidize.”

“There’s an inevitability to telling the truth – people never react the way you need them to.”

Advertisements

Review: You Know Me Well

LaCour Levithan You know me wellTitle: You Know Me Well

Author: Nina LaCour and David Levithan

Published: June 7, 2016

Synopsis (from Goodreads):

Who knows you well? Your best friend? Your boyfriend or girlfriend? A stranger you meet on a crazy night? No one, really?

Mark and Kate have sat next to each other for an entire year, but have never spoken. For whatever reason, their paths outside of class have never crossed.

That is, until Kate spots Mark miles away from home, out in the city for a wild, unexpected night. Kate is lost, having just run away from a chance to finally meet the girl she has been in love with from afar. Mark, meanwhile, is in love with his best friend Ryan, who may or may not feel the same way.

When Kate and Mark meet up, little do they know how important they will become to each other—and how, in a very short time, they will know each other better than any of the people who are supposed to know them more.

Told in alternating points of view by Nina LaCour and David Levithan, You Know Me Well is a story about navigating the joys and heartaches of first love, one truth at a time.

I love both David Levithan’s and Nina LaCour’s writing, so I thought this collaboration would be a perfect pairing. It ended up being not my favourite David Levithan collaboration, but it was still a good read. It’s a great novel to read during Pride Week as it’s set in San Francisco and features Pride festivities. There are a lot of coming out YA novels; this one is more about what happens after. I could definitely feel the passion and excitement of the characters at the end when they were embracing who they are, celebrating, and heading to the parade.

The characters, especially Katie, were very relatable. In particular, this book absolutely nailed a few things: running away from opportunities because you’re scared or because you think you’re not good enough or don’t deserve them, and pushing away someone you really like because you want to hold onto the idea of them and don’t want to ruin things – and you can’t ruin them if nothing’s begun.

At first I was a bit disappointed in how Mark’s storyline ended, or maybe I was just sad for him. At the same time, I liked that the novel didn’t end with everyone getting together with the person they liked. It can still be a happy ending without everyone pairing off in romantic couples. Plus it felt more realistic that way.

It was nice to have a novel focus on a platonic male-female relationship – in particular, a friendship that wasn’t toxic or dysfunctional, just a friendship where the two of them are there for each other, pushing each other to go after what they want, supporting each other through bad times, understanding each other in ways that other people don’t or can’t.

Favourite Quotes:

“And when I begin to worry that I chose the wrong college, or that my future roommate will hate me, or that I’m going to grow up and forget about the things I once loved – cobalt blue, this certain hill behind my high school, searching for old slides at flea markets, the song “Divided” – I think about Violet.”

“Because we lose it. We grow up and we lose ourselves. Sometimes when my favorite songs are on I have to stop what I’m doing and lie down on my carpet and just listen. I feel every word they’re singing. Every note. And to think that in twenty years, or ten years, or five, even, I might hear those same songs and just, like, bob my head or something is horrible. Then I’m sure I’ll think that I know more about life, but it isn’t true. I’ll know less.”

“And we step off the curb, all of us together, as if to say, Here we come – through hard days and good ones, through despair and through exhilaration, in love and out of love, for just now or for forever. Here we come. It’s our parade.”

You might also like: any of David Levithan’s collaborations – Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, Naomi and Ely’s No Kiss List, Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares (all with Rachel Cohn), Will Grayson, Will Grayson (with John Green), and other David Levithan books – Two Boys Kissing, How They Met and Other Stories, Boy Meets Boy, The Realm of Possibility + + check out Nina LaCour if you haven’t – The Disenchantments is a personal favourite!

Review: This is Where the World Ends

Zhang this is whereTitle: This is Where the World Ends

Author: Amy Zhang

Published: March 22, 2016

Synopsis (from Goodreads):

Janie and Micah, Micah and Janie. That’s how it’s been ever since elementary school, when Janie Vivien moved next door. Janie says Micah is everything she is not. Where Micah is shy, Janie is outgoing. Where Micah loves music, Janie loves art. It’s the perfect friendship—as long as no one finds out about it. But then Janie goes missing and everything Micah thought he knew about his best friend is colored with doubt.

Using a nonlinear writing style and dual narrators, Amy Zhang reveals the circumstances surrounding Janie’s disappearance in a second novel.

When I first heard about this book I thought it was about apocalypses and the world ending for real – as in, a meteor coming for earth or an actual zombie apocalypse or something like that. So I didn’t pay much attention to it because that’s not really my thing, but as it turns out that’s actually not what it’s about at all!

This book is a dual narrative, with Micah telling the “After” chapters and Janie telling the “Before” chapters. Eventually the Before and After kind of converge and you get a clearer picture of what happened. This did help to build suspense and keep me reading, because every time I found out a little bit more of what happened Before, the chapter cut off and we were back to After. Micah having amnesia also contributed to the suspense because he can’t remember what happened to Janie or how he ended up in the hospital; the reader finds out what happened only in bits and pieces.

I was disappointed because I guessed early on what had happened to Janie, although I didn’t know all the specific details of how. Because of that, the reveal and ending were not as shocking or unpredictable as they were probably meant to be. The book also seemed to end before it should have. There was the big reveal, a couple of lines that were maybe supposed to hint at closure, and then it was over. I felt the ending was too sudden, with some unanswered questions.

This definitely reminded me a lot of We Were Liars by E. Lockhart. Not only were there similarities in plot, but both also interspersed fairy tale re-tellings. In the case of This is Where the World Ends, every so often there was an excerpt from Janie’s journal. She was studying fairy tales for her senior project, so her journal was filled with re-written fairy tales that reflected the thoughts or situations of her and other characters. I did think this was well done, and it emphasized the idea that life is not always like a fairy tale, but even if it is, fairy tales can be dark and twisted and not end happily, just like the original fairy tales that many Disney movies are based on.

Although overall I was disappointed with this book, I might still read Amy Zhang’s debut, Falling into Place, at some point, because I did enjoy her writing style and I hear a lot of people saying that her first is better than this one.

Favourite Quotes:

“He is rainwater and smoke and wishes. He is honey and wind and bitter as truth and sharp with hurting and endlessly, unbearably sweet. He is air, finally, endlessly. Ease — that’s what it is, that’s what we are, we snap into place, or we glide, or we fall.”

“Micah was right — I would have wished and wanted but I would have been too scared to do anything. Just like everybody else. Everyone says they want to travel and leave home and find themselves or whatever, but they never do it. That’s what high school’s for. You make plans and you don’t follow through. You dream and you can be brave when you dream, brave enough to dream that there’s actually a yourself to find, brave enough to finish projects even though you were never born with endings, brave enough to plan volunteer trips even though you’d probably be dead of asphyxiation by the time you’re there because you’re always holding your breath as if that can keep you together.”

You might also like: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, All the Rage by Courtney Summers, Looking for Alaska by John Green, Paper Towns by John Green

Teaser Tuesday: June 21, 2016

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat.

Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Here’s my teaser (I actually chose 3 sentences):

Grandmother wanted me to love the stories, to take them into my heart through my ears and let them become a part of me, connecting me to all the people who told them before. It feels disrespectful just to give them away on a sheet of notebook paper. It feels wrong not to be able to include or incorporate the way she said certain words, and where she paused, in her retellings.

Henry The love that split that world

This is from page 89 of The Love that Split the World by Emily Henry. It’s a YA novel described as Friday Night Lights meets The Time Traveler’s Wife. I’ve still got lots of it left to read, but hopefully I will be able to review it soon!

2016 YA Releases I Can’t Wait to Read

2016 is shaping up to be a great year for YA releases; many of my favourite authors have interesting, intriguing, clever, and/or fun new releases coming out. It’s always awesome when some of your favourites have new books being released, because you know you’re almost guaranteed a good read. This list of five 2016 YA releases consists almost entirely of authors I’ve read before, except for #5.

Altebrando The Leaving

The Leaving by Tara Altebrando
(release date: June 7, 2016)

Tara Altebrando always seems to incorporate interesting and original concepts into her stories, whether it’s the history of Coney Island and carnival sideshows in Dreamland Social Club, or the contrast between the fakery of Las Vegas attractions and their real-life European counterparts in What Happens Here. It will be interesting to see her tackle thriller/suspense.

Caletti Essential Maps

Essential Maps for the Lost by Deb Caletti
(release date: April 5, 2016)

I will read anything Deb Caletti writes. End of story. I love her prose, and she has a way of perfectly capturing certain feelings and incorporating little details to make a story feel so real. Her newest has secrets and falling in love and tragedy and depression and alternating perspectives, and somehow incorporates the children’s novel From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (which I never got around to reading when I was younger, but maybe Caletti’s latest will inspire me to check it out).

Arnold Kids of Appetite

Kids of Appetite by David Arnold
(release date: Sept. 20, 2016)

David Arnold’s first book, Mosquitoland, was amazing, so I’m excited for his sophomore release. According to his websiteKids of Appetite is about:

1. A coded mission to scatter ashes across New Jersey.

2. The momentous nature of the Palisades in winter.

3. One dormant submarine.

4. Two songs about flowers.

5. Being cool in the traditional sense.

6. Sunsets & ice cream & orchards & graveyards.

7. Simultaneous extreme opposites.

8. A narrow escape from a war-torn country.

9. A story collector.

10. How to listen to someone who does not talk.

11. Falling in love with a painting.

12. Falling in love with a song.

13. Falling in love.

I can definitely say I’m intrigued.

Yovanoff Places no one

Places No One Knows by Brenna Yovanoff
(release date: May 17, 2016)

Brenna Yovanoff’s books can be strange in a good way, and this looks like no exception. I devoured her book Paper Valentine, which is less paranormal/horror/fantasy than her other books (genres which are not really my thing). Places No One Knows is apparently like this as well – more contemporary realistic with some elements of magical realism and fantasy. It involves dreams and waking up in other people’s dreams and connecting and sharing parts of yourself with another.

Cavallaro A study in Charlotte

A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro
(release date: March 1, 2016)

Just recently I got into watching BBC’s Sherlock. I’m super late to the game, I know, and I have no idea why. It’s so totally my thing: mysteries, clever deductions, sometimes snarky dialogue… I mean, I grew up reading Nancy Drew mysteries and playing Nancy Drew computer games. I wanted to be a detective, and had a magnifying glass and a spyscope for peering around corners! I had a notepad where I could record clues and suspects! Anyway, all of this is to say that I’m looking forward to A Study in Charlotte. It’s a sort of modern re-telling of Sherlock Holmes in which Charlotte Holmes and Jamie Watson are the descendants of Sherlock and Watson, respectively. They attend a Connecticut prep school and of course there is a suspicious death and much investigating and many twists and turns, I’m sure.